Dentist - Cumberland
2138 Mendon Rd, Suite 202
Cumberland, RI 02864
401-723-0350

Posts for: April, 2016

By Dental Associates of Cumberland
April 27, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Family Dentist  

Like charity and a three day long Netflix or Hulu binge, good oral hygiene and care always begins at home. Consuming sugary foods and drinks in moderation, along with good oral hygiene practices will put you and your family ahead of the curve when it comes to maintaining healthy teeth and gums, and in preventing gum disease. But in addition to brushing and flossing every day, professional Oral Healthdental care is also necessary to rid the teeth and gums of traces of food, bacteria, plaque, and biofilm that a toothbrush and floss can leave behind.

Preventive Dental Care in Cumberland

As with general health, many people don't go to the dentist until something goes wrong, often in the form of cavities and tooth decay (and the resulting pain), or signs of gingivitis and gum disease, like bleeding and receding gums. Dr. Angeles Felix, a family dentist at Dental Associates of Cumberland in Rhode Island, gently encourages patients to think about routine dental exams as an investment not only in their oral health but in their general health and wellness as well. The reason is simple. In addition to possible tooth loss, advanced periodontal disease has been linked with increasing the risk of complications associated with serious conditions like diabetes, cardiac disease, and stroke. When bacteria accumulates between the teeth and below the gum line, it can cause inflammation, which when left unchecked can often lead to more serious health problems.

Schedule an Appointment with a Family Dentist in Cumberland

While daily brushing and flossing are the first steps in maintaining your oral health and helping to prevent periodontal disease, professional cleanings, and regular checkups are also necessary to take care of what your toothbrush and floss can leave behind. Contact Dr. Angeles Felix at Dental Associates of Cumberland by calling 401-723-0350 to schedule an appointment today.


By Dental Associates of Cumberland
April 18, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
AToothlessTiger

Let’s say you’re traveling to Italy to surprise your girlfriend, who is competing in an alpine ski race… and when you lower the scarf that’s covering your face, you reveal to the assembled paparazzi that one of your front teeth is missing. What will you do about this dental dilemma?

Sound far-fetched? It recently happened to one of the most recognized figures in sports — Tiger Woods. There’s still some uncertainty about exactly how this tooth was taken out: Was it a collision with a cameraman, as Woods’ agent reported… or did Woods already have some problems with the tooth, as others have speculated? We still don’t know for sure, but the big question is: What happens next?

Fortunately, contemporary dentistry offers several good solutions for the problem of missing teeth. Which one is best? It depends on each individual’s particular situation.

Let’s say that the visible part of the tooth (the crown) has been damaged by a dental trauma (such as a collision or a blow to the face), but the tooth still has healthy roots. In this case, it’s often possible to keep the roots and replace the tooth above the gum line with a crown restoration (also called a cap). Crowns are generally made to order in a dental lab, and are placed on a prepared tooth in a procedure that requires two office visits: one to prepare the tooth for restoration and to make a model of the mouth and the second to place the custom-manufactured crown and complete the restoration. However, in some cases, crowns can be made on special machinery right in the dental office, and placed during the same visit.

But what happens if the root isn’t viable — for example, if the tooth is deeply fractured, or completely knocked out and unable to be successfully re-implanted?

In that case, a dental implant is probably the best option for tooth replacement. An implant consists of a screw-like post of titanium metal that is inserted into the jawbone during a minor surgical procedure. Titanium has a unique property: It can fuse with living bone tissue, allowing it to act as a secure anchor for the replacement tooth system. The crown of the implant is similar to the one mentioned above, except that it’s made to attach to the titanium implant instead of the natural tooth.

Dental implants look, function and “feel” just like natural teeth — and with proper care, they can last a lifetime. Although they may be initially expensive, their quality and longevity makes them a good value over the long term. A less-costly alternative is traditional bridgework — but this method requires some dental work on the adjacent, healthy teeth; plus, it isn’t expected to last as long as an implant, and it may make the teeth more prone to problems down the road.

What will the acclaimed golfer do? No doubt Tiger’s dentist will help him make the right tooth-replacement decision.

If you have a gap in your grin — whatever the cause — contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation, and find out which tooth-replacement system is right for you. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implant Surgery” and “Crowns & Bridgework.”


By Dental Associates of Cumberland
April 10, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: aspirin  
MakeSureYourDentistKnowsYoureTakingDailyAspirin

Aspirin has been a popular pain reliever and fever reducer for over a century. Its effect on the clotting mechanism of blood, however, has led to its widespread and often daily use in low dose form (81 mg) to help reduce the chances of heart attack or stroke in cardiovascular patients. While this has proven effective for many at risk for these conditions, it can complicate dental work.

Aspirin relieves pain by blocking the formation of prostaglandins; these chemicals stimulate inflammation, the body’s protective response to trauma or disease. Aspirin reduces this inflammatory response, which in turn eases the pain and reduces fever. It also causes blood platelets to stop them from clumping together. This inhibits clotting, which for healthy individuals could result in abnormal bleeding but is beneficial to those at risk for heart attack or stroke by keeping blood moving freely through narrowed or damaged blood vessels.

Even for individuals who benefit from regular aspirin therapy there are still risks for unwanted bleeding. Besides the danger it may pose during serious trauma or bleeding in the brain that could lead to a stroke, it can also complicate invasive medical procedures, including many in dentistry. For example, aspirin therapy could increase the rate and degree of bleeding during tooth extraction, root canal or other procedures that break the surface of soft tissue.

Bleeding gums after brushing is most often a sign of periodontal (gum) disease. But if you’re on an aspirin regimen, gum bleeding could be a side effect. A thorough dental examination will be necessary to determine whether your medication or gum disease is the root cause.

It’s important, then, to let us know if you’re regularly taking aspirin, including how often and at what dosage. This will help us make more accurate diagnoses of conditions in your mouth, and will enable us to take extra precautions for bleeding during any dental procedures you may undergo.

If you would like more information on the effects of aspirin and similar medications on dental treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Aspirin: Friend or Foe?




Archive:

Tags


Dentist Blog Cumberland, RIFacebook Dentist Profile Cumberland, RITwitter Dentist Profile Cumberland, RIGoogle+ Dentist Profile Cumberland, RIDentist Yelp Profile - Dental Associates of Cumberland - Cumberland, RI

Google Reviews for Dental Associates of Cumberland


Click here to read more reviews or here to leave a review!